Benjamin Kahn

Benjamin Kahn
« Sorry, But I Feel Slightly Disidentified …», 2017
Under colourful fabrics, a silhouette and a rhythm give the A, the first A of "Sorry, But I Feel Slightly Disidentified...", which will then be declined in as many tones as there are stereotypical carpets, ready to pounce. Conceived by Benjamin Kahn for and with performer and choreographer Cherish Menzo - Dutch of Surinamese descent - the piece provokes our views and prejudices about races, genders, social status, cultures.

Layer after layer, the performer unfolds and metamorphoses, anchored in her body and yet partially divested of the images she sends, sends back, and disturbs. In front of her and in front of them, the spectators cannot evade what is revealed there, so obviously close, and what they perceive, what they deduce from it, sometimes from their defending bodies. "Sorry, But I Feel Slightly Disidentified..." is a formidable embodiment of a portrait whose model never ceases to escape the frameworks and norms to which he is so often and stubbornly assigned.
Performance
Lafayette Anticipations
Saturday 26 Sep 2020
from 06:30 pm to 07:25 pm
Sunday 27 Sep 2020
from 05:30 pm to 06:25 pm


A few tickets to buy on site


Benjamin Kahn, Sorry but I feel slightly disidentified © Martin Argyroglo
Echelle Humaine / Benjamin Kahn, Sorry but I feel slightly disidentified
Benjamin Kahn, Sorry but I feel slightly disidentified © Martin Argyroglo
Benjamin Kahn, Sorry but I feel slightly disidentified © Martin Argyroglo

Participants

Benjamin Kahn is a dancer and choreographer who studied dramaturgy and theatre at the University of Aix en Provence, at the Conservatory of Rennes, and graduated of the ESAC (Ecole Supérieure des Arts du Cirque) in Belgium.
After his studies, he worked with choreographers such as Philippe Saire, Benjamin Vandewalles, Nicole Beutler, Ben Riepe, Frédéric Flamand, Maud Le Pladec, Egle Budvytyte, and Alessandro Sciaronni.

He considers dance and choreography as powerful political tools and is particularly interested in the construction and deconstruction of the way we look at individual and collective bodies.